Cults Eponymous ReleaseBefore Sony’s Columbia record label picked up the Brooklyn band Cults, they made do with a spare Bandcamp page and a text-only website to list upcoming shows.

Cults’ Madeline Follin and Brian Oblivion

Bloggers world-round seemed to marvel at the band’s ability to ignite industry interest without Facebook and Myspace – much like the rest of us wonder how we were ever able to meet at a pre-designated time and place before cellphones existed.

(Hint: Being good at what they do and having ties to the industry didn’t hurt.)

At their best, Cults offer simple, unpretentious, catchy pop tunes with a startlingly-retro production sensibility.

It’s a sound that’s novel and familiar at once, playing on the ear like a cross between The Ronnettes and Peter Bjorn and John.

We talked at length with co-producer and engineer Shane Stoneback who used a combination of vintage and modern tools to help the band craft huge, hazy, reverb-drenched mixes to complement their casually-cultivated air of mystery.

STONEBACK’S STORY

“Are you looking for work? Because I just fired somebody 30 minutes ago.”

The man facing Shane Stoneback was a large one, heavy-set and imposing. He carried a sandwich in one hand and a microphone in the other.

Stoneback, who would go on to work with Cults, Vampire Weekend, Sleigh Bells, F*d Up, and The Magic Kids, told a fateful lie: He said yes.

“Good. I’m going to sit in the lounge and eat this sandwich.’’ The studio manager passed him a Neumann U87 with his other hand. “By the time I come back, have this up so I can hear it in the headphones…”

…Continue reading about Stoneback’s use of the Roland Space Echo to warp many of the essential sounds on Cults at SonicScoop

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